Coalition for Excellence in Science and Math Education
28Aug/14Off

CESE Briefing to Legislative Committees a Big Hit!

Congrats to CESE's own Kim Johnson on a successful briefing on the CESE Method to the LESC/LFC comittees, who met today in Las Vegas, NM.

bfg_tweet

 

Way to go,Kim!

10Feb/14Off

Walter Bishop Murfin 1925-2014

murfin

Walter Bishop Murfin

Born March 28, 1925

Died February 6, 2014

I’ll bet you didn’t know that was Walt’s middle name? Well, it was. I don’t know if he cared whether anyone knew or not but, unfortunately, he is no longer here to berate me for telling everyone, and that hurts. Badly. Walt died yesterday (February 6, 2013).

Walt Murfin is shown here being awarded a CESE plaque honoring his many achievements (February 4th, 2012).

He had a very hard time of it for almost a year, first with a hemorrhagic stroke, and then finally with pneumonia. It was all too much for him. Even someone with such a strong will and intellect as his finally had to let go. His wife, Bettyann, stayed with him at his home until the end with her daughter next door, Walt’s son, John, and Hospice to help out. Still, it is pretty tough.

Walt was nearing 89, and a year ago, still sharp as a tack and a bit of a rascal on occasion to boot! But Bettyann shared him with us, CESE. So he was our rascal! He was one of the smartest people I have ever had the privilege of being around. He was also a good friend – a very good friend. Though meeting late in life, we saw things so much alike that it was as if he and I had known each other for many years. Sure, we didn’t agree on everything, but on most things. When he would get upset with me, he would eventually apologize. When I would get upset with him, he eventually would apologize. Yes – you heard that right. Walt was a complex person.

walt-plaque

Walt and CESE went together as if they were born for each other. I personally think that CESE gave him some added purpose as he got older and, in fact, he was a great asset to CESE. Walt, along with Marshall Berman, was the impetus behind the Murfin Method, or as he wished to call it, the CESE Method. This is a unique way of determining how to improve the educational system (K –12) in New Mexico. Walt worked on this for days at a time, developing the method and details of computations. Walt also help Marshall evaluate data when Marshall was on the state school Board of Education before it was done away with. He helped former CESE president, Steve Getty, perform needed analyses in his educational work. In other words, Walt became very wrapped up in education and in the CESE cause of improving not just science and math education in our state, but also improving all education. He worked on this constantly and passed the results and methods on to anyone who would listen. It has always been CESE’s hope that the state would seriously listen to what we have to say and act upon it. Walt worked very, very hard to that end. Even after his stroke, he recovered enough to almost desperately make sure that his work could be replicated. And people have been listening!

 And, Walt, we are trying to carry on, but you will be impossible to replace. The best we can do is to hope to come close.

 Walt, you have done more than your part to make the world a better place. That’s all one could ask of another person. We miss you very much, Walt. Happy sailing.

kimber_200

Kim Johnson

CESE Past President
Feb. 7th, 2014

31Oct/13Off

Update on CESE Method Now Available

CESE board member Kim Johnson has been hard at work refining our presentation on the CESE Method for determining how New Mexico's schools,  students and teachers are faring.  While the method was originally developed to provide clear paths to school improvement, it can also be used to make teacher merit evaluations much, much fairer than the proposed PED A-F method of assigning scores for performance.

figure-merit

You can peruse the updated presentation here. Questions about the CESE Method should be directed to board member Kim Johnson.

21Feb/13Off

Comparison of CESE Results to PED Grades

How do CESE Canonical Correlation Results compare to PED Grades?

One of the questions that is most asked of CESE when we present the CESE method is how the CESE Method results compare to the New Mexico Public Education Department (PED) grades.  Here is a two-page introduction that summarizes and provides context for a 29-page briefing which provides detailed comparisons for 2012 New Mexico school grades.